Course Topic: 

Chinese Foreign Policy Since End of the Cold War: Changed Relations between Beijing and the World.

Lecturer: Dr. Zhu Feng
Executive Director of China Center for Collaborative Studies of the South China Sea
Professor of International Relations, Nanjing University

Contact Information:
Tel: 025-8359-7367, 15251859327
Email:zhufeng@nju.edu.cn
 

Lecturing Date: Fall Semester of 2015

Course Introduction:
This course is purporting to lecture on evolution of China’s foreign policy since end of Cold War with focus on its goal, interest calculus, and essential means. As an introductory seminar, the course will provide students with analytical framework to examine how a rising power address its foreign interests and carry out on its external relations. The course will offer a concise but explicit interpretation of China’s foreign policy making process and domestic structure which affect its policy outcomes. The course will also pick up a number of essential bilateral ties, for instance, China-US relations, China-Japan relations and China-ASEAN relations, to demonstrate leading characters of its foreign policy.

Course Requirement:
Class participation 40% , Midterm exam 20%, Final exam 40%
Attendance will be important for keeping up with class. Good attendance and active classroom participation will be counted as important part of grading. Requested texts of exams are hands-out.
Credit: 3, lecturing goes for 3 hours with two 10 minute each break, and one time one week.

Lecturing Schedule:

Contending Analytical Frameworks of Chinese Foreign Policy

Session 1. Course Introduction:

Session 2. What Dominates Chinese Foreign Policy: contending theoretical lens

- Aaron Friedberg, A Contest for Supremacy: China, America and the Struggle for Mastery in Asia, W. W. Norton & Company, 2012.
- Robert S. Ross and Zhu Feng, China’s Ascent: Power, Security and the Future of International Politics, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009. 
- David Lampton: The Three Faces of Chinese Power: Might, Money and Minds, University of California Press, 2008.

Session 3. How to Prescribe China in the Process of its Ascent?

-David Lampton, Following the Leader: Ruling China, From Deng Xiaoping to Xi Jingping, University of California Press, 2014. 
-Nina Hachigian, Debating China: the U.S.-China Relationship in Ten Conversation, Oxford University Press, 2014. 
-David Shambaugh, China Goes Global: the Partial Power, Oxford University Press, 2013. 
- Susan Shirk, China: Fragile Superpower, Oxford University Press, 2008. .

Session 4. Chines Foreign Policy: Where It Comes From, and How It Goes Ahead.

- Robert S. Ross and Zhu Feng, China’s Ascent: Power, Security and the Future of International Politics, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009.
- Orville Schell and John Delury, Wealth and Power: China’s Long March to the Twenty-First Century, David Lindroth, Inc., 2013. 
-Andrew Nathan and Andrew Scobell, China’s Search for Security, Columbia University Press, 2012.

Chinese Foreign Policy: Thinking, Making and Implementing

Session 5. Domestic Variables and Chinese Foreign Policy

- Ezra Vogel, Deng Xiaoping: Transforming China, Harvard University Press, 2011. 
- Zhu Feng, “China and the U.S. might not go to new Cold War”, ASAN Electronic Quarterly, No. 1, 2013. 
- Zheng Wang, Never Forget National Humiliation: Historical Memory in Chinese Politics and Foreign Relations, Columbia University Press, 2012

 Session 6. External Variables and Chinese Foreign Policy

-Alastair Ian Johnston, Socialized State, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2010. 
-David Lampton: The Three Faces of Chinese Power: Might, Money and Minds, University of California Press, 2008.

Session 7. Chinese Foreign Policy Making Process

- David M. Lampton, Making of Chinese Foreign and Security Policy in the Reform Era, Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2001. 
- Marc Lanteigne, Chinese Foreign Policy: An Introduction, 2nd Edition, Routledge, 2013.

Session 8. Chinese Foreign Policy: Core Interest Paradigm and Assertive turnaround– China Rise at the Shadow of American Preponderance

-Alastair Iain Johnston, Social States: China in International Institutions, 1980-2000, Prince: Princeton University Press, 2008. 
-M. Taylor Fravel, Strong Borders Secure Nations, Princeton University Press, 2008.

Key Bilateral Ties: Case Studies and Empirical Tests

Session 9. China-U.S. Relations: Competing for What?

- Robert G. Sutter, U.S.-China Relations: Perilous Past, Pragmatic Present, Georgetown University Press, 2012. 
- Jeffrey A. Bader, Obama and China’s Rise: An Insider’s Account of America’s Asia Strategy, Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, 2013. 
- David Shambaugh, ed., Tangled Titans: United States and China, Rowan & Littlefield Publishers, 2012.

Session 10. China-Japan Relations: Great Power Rivalry on Air?

- Richard Bush, the Perils of Proximity: China-Japan Security Relations, Brookings Institution Press, 2013. International 
-Crisis Group, “Dangerous Waters: China-Japan Relations on the Rocks,” Asia Report No. 245 (8 April 2013)
- James Manicom, Bridging Troubled Waters: China, Japan, and Maritime Order in the East China Sea, Georgetown University Press, 2014. 
-Robert D. Eldridge, the Origins of U.S. Policy in the East China Sea Islands Dispute: Okinawa’s Reversion and the Senkaku Islands, Routledge, 2013. 
- Tokyo Foundation, “Japan’s Security strategy Toward China: Integration, Balancing, and Deterrence in the Era of Power Shift,” Policy Proposal (October 2011)

Session 11. China-Korea Relations:

- Scott Snyder, ed., The US-South Korea Alliance: Meeting New Security Challenges (London: Lynne Rienner Publisher, 2012), pp. 1-20.
- Jae Ho Chung, Between Ally and Partner: Korea-China Relations and the United States (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007), Ch. 1,7,8
- Zhu Feng, “China’s Troubled Allies: Beijing’s Policy of N. Korea”, East Asia Quarterly, No.2 (2011), pp. 23-45.

Problems and Prospects of Chinese Foreign Policy

Session 12. Interdependence, Integration and Chinese Behaviors

- Marc Lanteigne, Chinese Foreign Policy: An Introduction, 2nd Edition, Routledge, 2013. 
- Takahi Inoguchi and G. John Ikenberry, the Troubled Triangle: Economic and Security Concerns for the United States, Japan and China, Macmillan/Palgrave, 2013. 
-Orville Schell and John Delury, Wealth and Power: China’s Long March to the Twenty-First Century, David Lindroth, Inc., 2013.

Session 13. Territorial Disputes, Maritime Power Impulse, and China’s Future

- Bill Hayton, The South China Sea: the Struggle for Power in Asia, New Heaven: Yale Univerity Press, 2014. 
- Edward N. Luttwak, the Rise of China vs. the Logic of Strategy, Belknap Press, 2012
- Zhiguo Gao and Bingbing Jia, “the Nine Dashed Line in the South China Sea: History, Status, and Implications,” American Journal of International Law, Vol. 5, No. 1(2013),pp.98-107.

Session 14. Rise of China and Foreign Policy: Searching for Chinese Answer

- Aaron Friedberg, A Contest for Supremacy: China, America and the Struggle for Mastery in Asia, W. W. Norton & Company, 2012
- David Shambaugh, China Goes Global: the Partial Power, Oxford University Press, 2013. 
- Robert S. Ross and Zhu Feng, China’s Ascent: Power, Security and the Future of International Politics, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2009.

Session 15. Final Exam

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